Miles Carroll

Miles Carroll

Male 1811 - 1864

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  • Name  Miles Carroll 
    Born  11 Apr 1811  , Lincoln, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  8 Oct 1864  , Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Madden Cemetery, Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID  I231  All Family Connections
    Last Modified  30 Sep 2012 

    Father  William Carroll, Sr.,   b. Abt 1772,   d. Aft 1840 
    Mother  Mary Moore,   b. 1780,   d. Aft 1860 
    Married  1800 
    Family ID  F130  Group Sheet

    Family  Ruah Setzer,   b. 26 Aug 1816, , Lincoln, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Aug 1869, , Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  6 Dec 1834  , Macon, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Narcissa Cathrine Carroll,   b. 1835, , Macon, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 May 1887, Hawkeye, Pulaski, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Mary "Polly" Carroll,   b. May 1837, , Macon, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1903, , Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Susan Lucinda Carroll,   b. 8 May 1839, , Lincoln, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1921, Iberia, Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Henry W. Carroll,   b. Apr 1841, , Lincoln, NC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Oct 1908, St. Mary's Infirmary-Iberia, Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Martha Ann Elizabeth Carroll,   b. 2 Jun 1843, , Gilmer, GA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jan 1901, , Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. John Marion Carroll,   b. 7 Nov 1845, , Gilmer, GA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Nov 1912, Iberia, Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Ruah Levada Carroll,   b. 1848, , Gilmer, GA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Daniel Carroll,   b. Mar 1850, , Gilmer, GA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. William Carroll,   b. Abt 1856, , Gilmer, GA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1900
     10. Cordelia Jane Carroll,   b. Abt 1864, , Miller, MO, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified  6 Nov 2006 
    Family ID  F16  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • BIOGRAPHY: !copy of newspaper article, but do not know which newspaper or date.
      CIVIL WAR TOUCHED MILLER COUNTY FAMILIES
      The saga of Miles Carroll by Peggy Smith Hake

      BIOGRAPHY: During the Civil War years, not only did the American people fight the northern cause against the southern cause concerning the slavery question, but they also fought the political question of the older Democrat party against the newer Republican party.
      I recently visited with Mr. Hite Boren, age 102 years, who lives in the small community of Hawkeye and once again I draw important information from his marvelous storehouse of memories. Hite could remember, then a child, when all the old Civil War comrades would meet at his father's house and spend all night talking about their experiences during the war years and those following.
      As a wide-eyed child, he absorbed all these wonderful tales of yesteryear and can recite the most exciting stories today. Uncle Hite, as most folks call him, told me the Southerners were mostly Democrat in their political beliefs and the Union arm (sic) represented Abraham Lincoln and the newer Republican party platform. The South had a guerilla army called Bushwhackers and they terrorized the countryside with their unscrupulous and deadly behavior. Miles and Ruah (Setser) Carroll, with their family of 10 children, lived in southern Miller County near the old Madden community.
      They were new settlers to this region when the Civil War broke out, having just come from Macon County, North Carolina via Georgia in the late 1850s. A huge wagon train of 44 wagons made this trek to central Missouri with many settlers making a new home for themselves in our Miller/Pulaski area. Some of the family names included Carrol, Boren, Setser, Steen, Day, Strutton, Lowery and others. All these pioneer families came overland with their livestock, trudging the hundreds of miles through the autumn rains; behind wagons loaded with their earthly possessions. The wagon train increased in size as it proceeded westward through Tennessee, Kentucky and onward to Missouri.
      Uncle Hite reconstructed the Madden and Hawkeye communities for me during the Civil War years. The following were the homesteaders who lived in that general region during the 1860s...there was Tom Day; the Miles Carroll family down by the Tavern Creek; Ab(ner) Long; Jack Long, Nick(las) Long, Jack Thompson, Sol(omon) Keeth; Pete(r) Whitman; Dow Wall; Old Man Rutter, who was a preacher; Willis Lively; Elias Applewell; 'George Steen's folks'; Jack Akins, 'a fellow named Arnold'; ... Thornsberry; Will Pemberton; 'the Lowery's'; and Jim Boren.
      Also in the same area were the Pennsylvanians who migrated to Miller County in the same time era -- the Tallmans, Browns, Moores, Pitingers, ...gens, Irlands, Bennages and Johnstons. Southern Miller County was peopled by pioneers of very different backgrounds. The northern Pennsylvania Dutch were Republicans and non-slaveowners while the southern homesteaders, of varied backgrounds, were accustomed to a life of slave ownership. Joseph Carroll, whom I believe was a brother to Miles, owned one slave in 1862 and James Long owned one. Both men lived near each other in the old Madden community.
      Uncle Hite was of the opion, and I am sure he heard this quoted by his father many times as he grew up, that many central Missouri men went into the service of the Union army even though their hearts may have been with the Confederacy. They were able to acquire food and provisions for their wives and children from the Federal army and evidently the same was not available from the southern armies.
      Miles carroll was a native of North Carolina, born on April 11, 1811. At the age of 23 years in 1834, he married Ruah L. Setzer/Setser, daughter of ... and Catherine (Tarr) Setzer, born in Lincoln County, North Carolina on August 26, 1811. From 1834 until circa 1843, they lived in Macon County, North Carolina where their first four children were born, including Narcissa, Polly, Lucinda and Henry. After moving to Georgia, five more children were born -- Martha, John, Levada, Danial and William. Their 10th child, Cordelia Jane, was born in Missouri.
      Two of the Carroll sons, Henry, about 18 years old, and John, not yet 16 years, went off to war joining the Union forces of the north. They were young boys who wanted to fight a war that I doubt they even understood. It was said that Henry, a young teenager, 'went into the army barefooted.' How sad to think of mere children fighting such a ferocious and merciless war. The Civil War was a terrible time in our history. There will never be an accurate count of how many actually died in the four years between 1861-1865, but the estimated number is horrendous. The violence during those years was terrible as neighbor fought neighbor; family fought family; and it was described as the time when 'brother fought his brother.' Little trust could be found and everyone was skeptical of his neighbor.
      The story has been told through the generations about the death of Miles Carroll. The translation has probably either lost some truth or perhaps gained some over the years as the legend has survived almost 121 year since that day in October of 1864 when death overtook Miles Carroll. The following is what Hite Boren told me as he remembered the story his father, James Boren, told him when a child.
      Miles was 53 years old and too old to serve in the military, but his two oldest sons were away fighting for the North. It was rumored that the boys sent money home to their folks for safe keeping. Bushwhackers (Rebel vigilantes) rode roughshod spreading fear and havoc over the countryside of central Missouri. One autumn day they rode to the homestead of Miles Carroll and demanded money. He refused to hand any over, so they took him and marched him in front of their horses for miles, then returned him home, weary and worn out. They left at that time, but returned again about two weeks later and this time they dragged him from his house and shot him down in the front yeard of his homestead.
      Two of his daughters, Martha Carroll Shelton and Narcissa Carroll Strutton, were home and witnessed the murder of their father. The Bushwhackers terrorized the women telling them that if they attempted to move the body of their father into the house, they would burn it down. They rode off and a short while later, Ruah and two more of the Carroll daughters, Lucinda Lowery and Polly Smith, returned home to the frightful scene. The five women had just brought Miles into the house when the bushwhackers returned. With an axe in hand, Ruah challenged these outlaws, daring them to set foot in her house. Evidently she made believers of them because they rode away. The five women buried Miles Carroll on a hillside overlooking the Big Tavern Creek valley below, the first person interred in the Madden Cemetery.
      It is my understanding there are 32 Civil War veterans buried in the Madden Cemetery, one of which is James Monroe Smith, husband of Polly Carroll Smith. He was killed in gunfight on the streets of Iberia between northern and southern sympathizers a few years after the Civil War had ended. The conflict continued in Miller County for more than a decade after a peace truce was signed by Generals Grant and Lee in Virginia. James Monroe Smith was a brother to my great-grandfather, William Harrison Smith, son of John Wesley Smith and Nancy Stinnett Smith.
      I do not know for sure how the Grand Army of the Republic Post in Iberia acquired the name of Miles Carroll GAR Post No. 111, but I would assume that Squire John Ferguson was most likely the one responsible for the name. The grand old gentleman of Richwoods township, Squire Ferguson, was the cornerstone of the GAR in Miller County and was very influential in the community.
      Many descendants of Miles and Ruah (Setser) Carroll are scattered throughout the world today and many are yet in our mid-Missouri region in both Miller and Pulaski counties. The children married into the families of Smith, Strutton, Lowery, Shelton, Hull, Long, Coffey and Martin, whom (sic) are also pioneer families with deep roots in our communities.
      The rugged stories of our ancestors are wonderful to research and we realize these pioneer forefathers were a strong people as they set out to conquer a brutal frontier. Missouri was considered an 'untamed land' prior to and during the Civil War era and it took courageous people to tackle such a ruthless wilderness; settle it; and build an ever-lasting heritage for our present generation.

      CENSUS: !NC 1840 Federal Census Index -- Ancestry.Com
      Listed Miles Carroll, Macon Co, P 148

      CENSUS: !GA 1850 Federal Census Index -- Ancestry.Com
      Listed Miles Carroll, #33 Sub-division, Gilmer Co., P 369

  • Sources 
    1. [S89] Madden Cemetery, Miller Co., MO, Inventoried by Dianna (Hale) Mattingly & Glenda (May) Crawford, (Last inventoried 19 April 2001) (Reliability: 3).

      CARROLL, Miles b. 11 Apr 1811 d. 8 Oct 1864